I’m sharing my thoughts on the Peloton app after having used it for the last 6 weeks or so.

I’m sure that with so many working out at home with gym closed down due to the pandemic, you’ve seem people sharing their Peloton workouts online. At first I thought that you needed to buy a bike or treadmill to be able to do their workouts, but you don’t! You can do the cycling, treadmill, and bootcamp workouts on any bike or treadmill, though you won’t be able to use some of the advanced features. In addition, they also have cardio, strength, yoga,and stretching workouts that don’t require any big expensive piece of cardio equipment. They also have quite a collection of meditations that I also enjoy doing.

Equipment

I don’t have a bike at home, but I have been using my own (non-Peloton) treadmill to do the bootcamp, walking, and running workouts. To be honest I’m not a runner so I’ve only done one running workout. I really do enjoy the bootcamp and walking workouts on the treadmill though. While I know that I wouldn’t work as hard without someone else asking me to, so I’m so glad that I have the app there to push me when I need it. I honestly don’t feel like I’m missing out at all on the app because I don’t have a bike.

You will need a few pieces of equipment to do the majority of the workouts on the app though. The strength workouts will require up to three sets of dumbbells (typically small, medium, and heavy – whatever that means for you), a yoga mat, and a towel for cushioning if you’re kneeling. If you’re in the market for dumbbells, I like these ones (affiliate link). If you need a mat I like this one (affiliate link). The equipment is needed clearly marked for each workout so you know before starting the workout exactly what you’ll need. For the dumbbells I would start out with two or three pairs of them and start with that. As you get stronger over time, then you can invest in heavier ones. When you’re just starting out though I think you’ll do fine with a smaller selection.

Class timing

There’s two ways that you can take Peloton app classes – live or on demand. You can check the schedule each day to see which live classes are available, or you can pick from hundreds of other classes that they have on demand. I haven’t done a live class yet just because I like to get my workouts done right away. If I have to wait 20 minutes to do it, there’s a high likelihood that I won’t do the workout. If you have more discipline than me give some of the live classes a go. You can do them with friends who also use the app. You may even get a shout out from the instructor leading the class.

Class selection

In terms of the classes offered on the app, you can pick from:

  • strength
  • yoga
  • cardio
  • meditation
  • running
  • outdoor
  • cycling
  • strentching
  • bootcamp
  • walking

Out of all the classes I’ve taken so far I’ve enjoyed them all – there haven’t been any duds. The instructors are motivating and full of energy without being annoying about it. I think that everyone’s taken a fitness class with someone who’s just a bit too over the top. That hasn’t been the case with Peloton. The classes vary in time from 5 minutes for some of the stretches to 90 minutes for some of the cycling classes. The max length for the yoga ones are 75 minutes, and 60 minutes for the run workouts. Of course you also have the option of doing workouts back to back. For instance if you want to combine cycling and strength training, or running and yoga, you can do that.

Filters

The Peloton app has a great set of filters built into it. You can search classes based on length, class type, instructor, difficulty, and music. Being able to sort through the classes quickly makes it really easy to find exactly the workouts that I’m in the mood for. You’re even able to favorite workouts while searching for them. That makes it really easy to find them to do later. I’ve favorited a couple workouts the night before so that when I get up to workout the next morning first thing, they’re super quick to find again.

Using the filters you can get really specific about the kind of workout you want based on how much time you have to workout and the body parts you want to work. For example you could find all of the intermediate 30 minute lower body strength workouts with a particular instructor pretty quickly. I’ve found the app to be really intuitive and easy to use.

Speaking of instructors, I think everyone has their favorites. I’m a huge fan of Andy Speer. He gets me moving and working hard even when I don’t think I have the motivation to on my own. He’s also really knowledgeable and has just the right intensity for me to connect with. I really enjoy classes with Cody Rigsby and Kristin McGee. Kristin is huge in the yoga world so I was pretty excited when I saw that she taught on the app.

Like I mentioned above, one of the types of filters you can use is genre of music. I’m not much of a country fan, so I haven’t done any of those workouts, but I do like pop and rock so I’ve gravitates more to those workouts. Each workout also has a list of the songs used in it so if you have a favorite artist or song you have something to look forward to during the workout. Another note about the music used is that it’s the original artists doing the songs. Some fitness classes will use songs re-done, but that’s not the case with Peloton. In those cases the music can end up being a bit cheesy.

One thing that I’ve done more of with the Peloton app that I haven’t done nearly as much of when I was at the gym was stretching. I’m stretching after nearly every single strength and cardio workout now. When I was at the gym pre-pandemic that was something I hardly ever did even know I know that I should have done it. Once again I can use the filters to find exactly the stretching videos that I want. If I’m feeling motivated I can do a 15 minute one or a quick 5 minute stretch if I’m short on time. The app also offers pre and post ride and run stretches as well.

Cost

I pay under $20 CAD per month for my Peloton subscription. I was able to try it out for free for a month before I decided if I liked it or not. $20 is just a fraction of what my gym charged me per month, so I’m getting a great deal on all the workouts I want every month at home. The trade off is having to get my own equipment. I think Peloton does a great job of using the equipment in lots of different ways. I’m able to utilize each dumbbell, yoga mat, and yoga prop I have in lots of different ways so that I don’t get bored and I do lots of different exercises.

Personally I’m not feeling comfortable going back to my gym anytime soon. It’s not a risk that I’m willing to take in my situation. I’m much happier to do workouts at home with the Peloton app and buying more equipment piece by piece as I get stronger and need heavier dumbbells. The big thing that I’ll be missing not going back to my gym are Group Power classes. Being able to use that barbell for squats and lunges is going to be something that I can’t replicate at home right now, but I’m also spending a lot less every month right now.

Have you tried the Peloton app before? If you have the bike or treadmill, how do you like them?

This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting my blog – I appreciate it!

Peloton App
Tagged on:         

Privacy Preference Center

Necessary

Facebook advertising, Amazon affiliate links, Google Analytics.

Facebook, Amazon, Google Analytics

Advertising

Facebook Advertising

Facebook

Analytics

To find out analytics

Google Analytics

Other