Today I’m sharing some of my favorite personal development books. I’m not at all woo woo, so I like the ones that are very straight forward and action based – so that’s what you’ll find here.

Over the last year or so I’ve been reading more personal development books. They can be hit or miss for me, so I thought I’d share some of my favorite ones with you today. I like personal development books that help me create goals or give tips for being more productive. Like most people I wish I had a few extra hours in the day.

Big Magic

When I first got this book I was thinking that it might be too woo woo for me, but I ended up really like it. It was the first book by Elizabeth Gilbert that I’ve read – I think I might be one of the last people who hasn’t read Eat, Pray, Love.

If you do anything creative, this book is for you. Blogging is my creative outlet, and even though I don’t do it for my day job, I’m very grateful that I can so something creative that I enjoy outside of work. Whether or not creative work is something that you do for your day job or just for fun, I think you’ll get something out of this book.

Creative pursuits can sometimes be lonely – I know it can be with blogging because I don’t know many bloggers in real life. Reading about someone else’s creative journey made me feel like I wasn’t as alone. It can be a bumpy road sometimes when the creative juices aren’t flowing. Hearing someone else’s struggles helped me feel less alone in those less creative times.

The 7 Habits of Highlight Effective People

This is such a classic book that’s been around since the 70’s. You know it’s a good personal development book when it’s been around for decades. The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People (affiliate link) is a book that will help you figure out your values and priorities, which will in turn make sure that your goals will be what you really want. It’s so easy to create a list of goals at the beginning of the year just because you think they should be goals. The 7 Habits helps you determine what’s most important to you so you can then create goals that support those values.

Stephen Covey gives all sorts of real life examples from people that he had worked with. Sometimes a principle or idea didn’t make sense to me until he talked about it in relation to someone that he worked with.

This is one of those books that you’ll want to read with a pen or highlighter handy. There are so many good points that I want to make sure I mark to be able to comeback to later on without having to reread the entire book. There’s so many good nuggets in there!

The Desire Map

I just recently finished reading The Desire Map (affiliate link) by Danielle LaPorte. It’s a bit different from your typical personal development books. Danielle advocates for making goals and doing things that make you feel a certain way. She walks you through figuring out your Core Desired Feelings. These guide you in then creating your goals.

I have to admit that it took awhile for me to get into The Desire Map. I’ve a very type A person, so it sounded a bit woo woo, but I’m so glad that I stuck with it. It’s so easy to get caught up in the whole goal getting mindset and you end up completely missing the point of the goal.

The Desire Map is all about checking in with yourself and checking to see if your goals are still matching up with your core desired feelings. Danielle is a big advocate of letting go of things that aren’t working for you any longer. It was such a good reminder for me because I don’t like to leave things unfinished. However, sometimes it’s not worth putting the time and energy into something that’s no longer serving you.

The One Thing

This is my favorite self development book that I’ve read so far. The basic premise of The One Thing (affiliate link) is that you create your daily to do list based on your long term goals. It’s such a simple idea that’s made a huge difference for me.

You essentially break down those big, long term goals into smaller, bite sized tasks. You then schedule them into your week. They suggest devoting 4 hours to your goals each work day. It’s easy to let those little tasks take over your day and in the end they don’t really move us any closer to goals, but we do them because they’re easy and familiar. The authors of The One Thing put an emphasis on making sure you’re doing the things that will actually help you achieve your goals.

The Slight Edge

I really liked the Slight Edge because it was all about making little tweaks that add up long term big changes. Something as little as committing to getting in 10,000 steps on a daily basis can help you be more active. Committing to reading for 30 minutes each day can lead you to reading more books than you did last year.

The Slight Edge (affiliate link) made a great case for the fact that you don’t have to make these big, huge changes in your life to get results. Little changes over a longer time period can add up to bigger things. I really like that approach because it makes achieving goals a lot less intimidating.

You Are a Badass

I had seen You Are a Badass all over social media for a year or two before I finally borrowed it from the library. Everyone seemed to have good things to say about it, so I was looking forward to reading it.

I’m happy to say that I wasn’t disappointed. The chapters were nice and short so it felt like I was flying through it. It was easy to read and there were a lot of great nuggets of wisdom throughout it.

Not all books that have been hyped up on social media have been great, but this one definitely was. A lot of the stories that Jen Sincero shares are funny and I can see how they’d apply to my life. It’s definitely one of those personal development books that doesn’t take itself too seriously.

What’s a favorite personal development books of yours that you’ve read lately? I’d love to add some more to my to be read list, so share them in the comments below.

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My Favorite Personal Development Books

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